The Last Drop

Reviews and Clues on Music That Matters (to me)

Archive for the ‘St. Vincent’ tag

New Issue: St. Vincent

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St Vincent, Strange Mercy –  It’s time to face a reality – it’s truly hard to have a love affair without really knowing the person. With that being said, I’m finding it harder and harder to describe my relationship with Annie Clark and her music – obsession seems to oblique, idolized has odd religious undertones, and respect seems to clinical. Needless to say, this will be yet another glowing review of her latest musical installment, Strange Mercy.

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Written by TopDrop

February 28th, 2012 at 1:00 am

One is the Loneliest Number

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But it makes for good music. Seems like solo is the way to go. Thanks to technology and a lack of ego. As if we didn’t already know, musicians are embracing the “technological revolution” in every way. From free downloads to freeing yourself from band members. Indie is going solo but in a distinctively non-singer songwriter way. This is not Bob Dylan’s influence (I just saw I’m Not There). And all three artists spotlighted will tell you that. It’s all about doing more with more. Oh and my Top Drop of 2007 is mentioned heartily in the article.

The Return of the One Man Band

Written by TopDrop

May 21st, 2008 at 2:19 pm

New Issue: St. Vincent

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St. Vincent, Marry MeThe last of my all female run, I promise. And the best was saved for it. Having been a stable backing member for other bands/artists that I really appreciate (Polyphonic Spree, Sufjan Stephens), I was happily awaiting Annie Clark’s work but didn’t know what to expect. She seems well versed in many genres so she had a lot of options. She chose the electronic/folk route (ala Imogen Heap and such). Which definitely works. Her voice is void of the over-processed sound generally attributed to other well known female electronic artists, but she still uses protools to fill out her sound. Lots of layering, but not cluttered. The overall feel is honest, sincere, and slighlty self conscious. All charming. With a title like Marry Me, it could have gone the route of desperation. But she steers clear of pleading and relies much more on poignant insights on relationships.The first half focuses on her skills as multi-instrumentalist and social commentary on current events while the second half showcases her simple songwriting ability. I must say I favor the latter half moreso since it showcases her vocal vulnerability. It’s a great foil for her evident talent of playing any and all instruments. So many songs just find a way to be touching in a genuine way. A great sign of solid songwriting and great delivery.

Written by TopDrop

September 27th, 2007 at 9:36 pm

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